Antisocial behaviour

What is antisocial behaviour (ASB)?

Antisocial Behaviour (ASB) is defined as engaging in or threating to engage in conduct causing or is likely to cause nuisance or annoyance to persons engaged in lawful activities. This means any behaviour that effects your quality of life in a negative way which is caused by a person you do not live with.

ASB is behaviour that is classed as antisocial and may or may not involve criminality. The antisocial behaviour may also affect more than one household.

Types of antisocial behaviour may include:

  • Noise nuisance – any noise or music that may be considered as antisocial.
  • Verbal abuse/harrasment or intimidation – shouting or swearing in or around the locality of the property.
  • Drug use – drug use or supply from or in the locality of the property.
  • Damage to property – Criminal damage should be reported to the local Police
  • Dropping rubbish or fly-tipping – Fly-tipping should be reported to us so that we can clear it or report it to the local council.
  • Being drunk and rowdy in public
  • Graffiti – This can be classed as criminal damage and should be reported to the local Police.

Examples of things that are not classed as antisocial behaviour include:

  • Children playing considerately
  • Neighbour disputes without breaches of tenancy
  • Parking disputes– vehicles causing an obstruction or blocking access can be dealt with by your local Police. Vehicles parked on single and double yellow lines are dealt with by your local council traffic wardens.
  • Noise from normal daily living

We work very closely with the Police and have a multi-agency approach to dealing with complaints of antisocial behaviour. The Safer Communities Team investigate the complaints and use a range of tools to gather evidence, including noise recording equipment amongst other things.

To contact your local Police please call 101 or visit www.police.uk and enter your postcode to find your local policing team.

Our Anti-Social Behaviour Policy outlines what we class as anti-social behaviour and goes through the ways we tackle it in the community. 

 

Actions that may resolve antisocial behaviour issues

If you are experiencing antisocial behaviour, here are a few steps that you could try to help resolve the issues:

  • Talk to the person(s) that you think are causing the issues in a friendly and calm manner – it may be that they are unaware that they are causing a problem for you.
  • Always call the police if you have been a victim of a crime. This includes you and your property. Call 101 to contact your local Police to report the crime or dial 999 in an emergency.
  • Keep a diary of incidents providing as much detail as possible – these can be used as evidence if the case escalates.
  • You could use a civil remedy and would be given more information by contacting your solicitor, Citizens Advice Bureau or Shelter.

If matters don’t improve, we may be able to offer further support and guidance.

We have a range of tools and powers available to us as is proportionate and appropriate. In the majority of cases, we will use early intervention and prevention to combat ASB. These include interviewing perpetrators early on, giving verbal and written warnings, using Acceptable Behaviour Contracts (ABCs) and Unacceptable Behaviour Warnings (UBW), mediation, and restorative justice. We will offer help and support by referring individuals and families into support, such as drug and alcohol treatment services, tenancy support (both internal and external) or other appropriate services.

Enforcement action will be taken where all other interventions have failed or the incident(s) are serious enough to warrant urgent intervention.

What is a noise nuisance

The law states that people should tolerate ‘reasonable’ amount of noise being caused by others as part of their normal daily lives.

We sometimes receive complaints about noisy children, banging of doors, and late-night arrivals and departures – these are not classed as noise nuisances.

What happens with my complaint?

If you tell us about ASB, we will:

  • Treat you seriously and investigate the incident.
  • Allocate you a dedicated case officer and tell you who they are.
  • Speak to you within 1-5 working days depending on the seriousness of your case.
  • Work with you to gather evidence of the nuisance.
  • Contact you at least every two weeks to keep you up to date with what we’re doing to rectify the problem.
  • Tell you what we have done to deal with the problem or explain to you why we are unable to take action.
  • Offer support to you and any witnesses, and tell you about anyone else who can help, such as Victim Support.
  • Contact you for feedback following the closure of your case and use this information for any future service improvements.

We also promise to work closely with local authorities, the police and other agencies to prevent further ASB, and we’ll speak to anyone responsible for the ASB too.

We will make contact with those responsible for the ASB as soon as possible. In many cases this early intervention resolves the issues. We will never share who has made a complaint, but in some cases this may be obvious.

Where appropriate, you will be asked to complete diary sheet – this is used to record further incidences and if after 14 days the nuisance still continues, you are asked to return the completed diary sheets.

Incident diary form

These diary sheets are important as they show us the frequency and severity of further incidents.  You will be regularly contacted and updated throughout this process.

We may have to share information with other agencies such as the police or the courts. This will all be done in line with the relevant legislation and where possible and appropriate you will be kept informed.

If you feel that your complaint has not been appropriately deal with, there is a process called The Community Trigger, which brings together partner agencies such as the Police and local authorities to investigate your case and to make sure it has been dealt with properly. Acis may also carry out a review of the case and complaint.

What will Acis do?

If you tell us about ASB, we will:

  • Treat you seriously and investigate the incident.
  • Allocate you a dedicated case officer and tell you who they are.
  • Speak to you within 1-5 working days depending on the seriousness of your case.
  • Work with you to gather evidence of the nuisance.
  • Contact you at least every two weeks to keep you up to date with what we’re doing to rectify the problem.
  • Tell you what we have done to deal with the problem or explain to you why we are unable to take action.
  • Offer support to you and any witnesses, and tell you about anyone else who can help, such as Victim Support.
  • Contact you for feedback following the closure of your case and use this information for any future service improvements.

We also promise to work closely with local authorities, the police and other agencies to prevent further ASB, and we’ll speak to anyone responsible for the ASB too.

Mate and hate crime

Hate Crime:

Is defined by any criminal offence which is perceived by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice, based on a person's:

Disability, race, religion, gender, nationality, sexual oriantation, transgender

If you are a victim of, or a witness to, a hate crime or incident, please report it to the Police, alternatively you can contact Stop Hate UK on 0800 138 1625.

Mate crime:

Is defined as a crime in which a person befriends a vulnerable person with the intention of then exploiting the person financially, physically or sexually.

If you believe that somebody has been exploited please contact your local Police on 101.

Domestic abuse

Any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality. This can encompass, but is not limited to, the following types of abuse:

  • Physical and sexual violence
  • Living in fear of further violence
  • Threats of further violence or harming the children
  • Breaking objects, hurting pets, abusive language
  • Isolating an individual from family and friends
  • Controlling access to money, being prevented from going to work

Controlling behaviour:

A range of acts designed to make a person subordinate and/or dependent by isolating them from sources of support, exploiting their resources and capacities for personal gain, depriving them of the means needed for independence, resistance and escape and regulating their everyday behaviour.

Coercive behaviour:

An act or a pattern of acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation or other abuse that is used to harm, punish, or frighten their victim.

If you ring us and want to talk we will:

  • Investigate all incidents of domestic abuse in a sensitive and consistent manner and within an agreed time frame.
  • Support you and ensure confidentiality at all times where possible.
  • Take appropriate action against perpetrators with the full knowledge, consent and involvement of you.
  • Work in partnership with other agencies to prevent and stop domestic abuse.

If you or someone that you know is experiencing domestic abuse we will help.

We can provide support and guidance on what to do and where to go.

Acis understand that sometimes it can be extremely difficult to talk about domestic abuse but please be assured that your case will be dealt with in the strictest of confidence.

We attend weekly multi-agency meetings to review any Acis customers that are classed high risk and work together to find a solution to best protect the individual(s) involved.

Our Safer Communities Team can offer additional safety features to our customers – some of the things that we can offer are:

  • PIR Sensor lights
  • Door chains
  • Lock changes
  • Fit external letter boxes

Each case will be looked at on an individual basis to see what is appropriate and best suited for the situation.

Helpful services

NHS      Women's aid      Sheffield DACT   Domestic abuse in Lincolnshire   West Lincolnshire domestic abuse service

Reporting antisocial behaviour

Antisocial behaviour incident form

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